Blog Archives

STAR Kampuchea Holds Discussion on Land Grabbing in Koh Kong Province and Results of Land Monitoring

On 27 March, STAR Kampuchea (SK) organized a half-day roundtable discussion on land reform monitoring and a land grab case on A Resettlement by an Economic Land Concession (ELC) in Botum Sakor and Kiri Sakor districts, Koh Kong Province. This activity aims to validate the results of SK’s research, gathering feedback from groups working on land, and submit the recommendations from the land grab study to government and other stakeholders in order to strengthen national policies on agricultural investments that promote national food security and protect the rights of small- scale food producers and local communities. [MORE]

Discussions took place among 20 participants from national and international NGOs, World Bank, ILC partners, and NES-Cambodia partners, who have years of experience in land issues in Cambodia. They were actively engaged in the discussions and provided useful comments and recommendations.

Suggestions on the CSO land reform monitoring report focused on data verification with state institutions and NGOs, and citation of sources. Regarding the land grab study, participants gave recommendations for government, related institutions, UDG, Co. Ltd., in four key areas:

Strengthening land local governance

– Create new, fair and independent commissions, whose members shall be composed of the concerned competent institutions, local authorities, and the representatives of the reallocated people in order to ensure that the affected and relocated people are paid in fair and just manner.

– Allow the affected people and the concerned local authorities to participate in all steps of land concession granting

– Create clear technical tools in order to measure and control the quality of all newly-built wooden houses for the reallocated people.

Ensuring food security

– Create and conserve outside development areas with fertile agricultural land and fishery areas together with accessible irrigation systems where the allocated people can do agriculture and fishing for their livelihoods

– Provide rice and monetary subsidy for agricultural and fishing activities and emergency food support (Humanitarian support)to the affected and allocated people

–  Improve capacity of the affected, allocated people with processing and research marketing skills, which is a means for them to produce and sell products to improve their livelihoods.

Protection of food producers and community rights

– Provide residential and agricultural land titles to the reallocated people and develop infrastructure before the company moves them according to the Leopard Policy, which in case any overlapping area between the land of affected people and the company,  land shall be cut from the development area and belong to the affected people.

– Encourage and promote local communities to produce food products by providing them the life skills and food processing skills which respond to the industrial demands or local consumers in the long time

Facilitating innovative production arrangements

– Should provide facilitations and access to their residential and agricultural land for their farming and fishing when they are not ready to move out

– Build linkages with the other private sectors so the affected and allocated people can have access to the markets for their products and provide them opportunities to get jobs from the investing companies

– Provide long-term scholarships and vocational skills to youth, women, disable people, and children who are affected by the concessions

– Arrange suitable and appropriate public services each as:

  • Developing and restoring the drinking water, irrigation system and special zonesfor the affected and allocated people to do agriculture and fishing
  • Developing  infrastructure to connect with community’s road systems
  • Building more schools and provide sufficient teachers
  • Establishing healthcare centers and toilets according to the national standards(nurses, medicines, health-care staffs,  and appropriate materials and equipment)

Moving forward

After revising the reports, STAR Kampuchea will send the summarized recommendations of the land grab case to the Ministry of Forestry and Fishery (MoFF), which is responsible for compliance on Economic Land Concessions (ELC) and the Ministry of Land Management, Urbanization, and Construction (MLMUC), which is responsible for Social Land Concessions (SLC), the National Assembly, and other relevant institutions.

ImageImageImageImageImage

 

The presentations are available for download (in PDF form):

Advertisements

Land grabs in Cambodia classic case of David and Goliath

PHNOM PENH: Cambodia’s economy may be exhibiting robust growth, but to those who have lost their lands to commercial developers and other businesses, it’s no consolation at all.

In April, the Asian Development Bank said while the growth of Cambodia’s economy will slightly moderate in 2012, it will pick up again and expand 7% in 2013 on strong exports, growing services and more stable economic outlook.

Cambodia’s  government has been urging investors to sink in money into the economy to be able to sustain growth.

But STAR Kampuchea, a Phnom Pehn-based NGO, said  companies’ answer to the call for investments has resulted in the poor losing their lands to powerful private companies. Read the rest of this entry

2 New publications from Land Watch partners in India and Cambodia

“Landlessness and Social Justice: An assessment of Disparities in Land Distribution and Prospects of Land Reforms”

http://www.praxisindia.org/files/Landlessness_English%20.pdf

This is the result of a joint initiative of Ekta Parishad and the Institute for Participatory Practices (PRAXIS), which facilitated a land mapping process in five districts of Bihar, India.

Securing the Right to Land in Cambodia (in Khmer)

Star Kampuchea publishes its country paper on access to land in Cambodia in Khmer to share the information more widely especially in the rural areas. The paper was originally part of the Land Watch Asia regional book entitled “Securing the Right to Land” that features an overview of the state of access to land in Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Nepal and the Philippines.

Khmer Securing Land Rights paper